Acupuncture and Herb

Chinese Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine
2 Year Degree Level Diploma Course

 

1 Weekend per month, minimum 2 years with option of 3rd year or 2 years full time (this includes extra clinical experience at an extra cost of £50 per Clinical day)(see dates below)

 

Next 2 Year Weekend Course Admission Dates

2014 Dates

22 / 23 November 2014
13 / 14 December 2014

2015 Dates

21 / 22 February 2015
21 / 22 March 2015
18 / 19 April 2015

16 /17 May 2015         
20 / 21 June 2015       
18 / 19 July 2015   

19/20 Sept 2015           
24/25 October  2015      
21/22 November 2015   
12/13 Decembe
r  2015 

Contact Paul Robin acusoc@yahoo.co.uk call 07734668402

Interviews for weekend course by appointment only at the below addresses

University of London
International Hall Meeting Room or Conservatory
Lansdowne Terrace
London WC1N 1AS
View Map

 

 

Midweek apprenticeship learning courses in clinical environment on most wednesdays and thursdays for those unable to make the weekend dates

Contact Paul Brecher on paul@taiji.net or 07534 493888

Interviews by appointment only at this address

College of Chinese Medicine
17 Lankaster Gardens
East Finchley
London N2 9AZ
View Map

CCM Teaching Clinic East Finchley

Course ContentContentReturn to Top ↑

This two year degree level course with and optional 3rd year clinical attachment is a practical professional training course to enable students to achieve high standards of competance, safety and confidence as practitoners of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

There is a further option to do this course as an Acupuncture and TCM Diagnosis course without Chinese Herbal Medicine.

Students will be applying TCM diagnosis and practicing on each other under supervision in a clinical environment from their very first lesson as well as being taught the theoretical understanding of what they are learning because TCM is a practical subject and is best learnt in a practical way.

There are 10 weekend modules (20 contact days) in the first year and the same in the second year. Students can begin the course on any module and provided that all 10 (2 day) modules are successfully completed they can then proceed to the second year which has a similar continual arrangement.

Where days have been missed students can arrange with their course tutor extra lessons to catch up with what they have missed, a fee of £100 per extra lesson applies.

The 'Ethos of the College' is to 'fit treatments to patients' rather than 'patients to treatments' thus depending on Traditional TCM diagnostic skills to make patient assessments rather than follow theories which may pre anticipate a patients condition. Acurate assessment is the key to sucessful and effective treatment, this is confirmed through Pulse, Face, Tongue, Eye and other Traditional Chinese methods of examination with targeted questioning about the patients condition and medical history.

The Clinical training aspects of the course are taught by Paul Brecher BA FAcS MPCHM  Principal of The College of Chinese Medicine on Wednesdays and by Paul Robin  Head TCM at The College of Chinese medicine and Chairman of the Acupuncture Society on Thursdays.

The weekend 1st and 2nd year classes in Acupuncture, Herbal Medicine and Diagnosis are run by Paul Robin

This object of this course is to achieve standards set out by the Acupuncture Society Accreditation process and is a professional training diploma course in Chinese acupuncture, herbal medicine and diagnosis, the emphasis is on achieving set standards of practical and clinicial training. Students will be treating each other during the modules and through clinical experiance combined with TCM theory to learn practical clinical skills in there correct setting.

The course will cover chinese anatomy, meridians and points, pathology, pulse reading and analysis, tongue, face, Chinese irridology and skin diagnosis, Auricular, Orthopaedic and Cosmetic Acupuncture, knowledge of around 200 herbal medicines and thier appropriate use in clinical practice. Students will be tested on the contents of each module.

This course is taught in the same practical way that a practitioner would treat their patients, this is the way masters taught students in china through the centuries.

We hear the patient describe their symptoms and explain any western medical diagnosis they may have been given, then we use traditional chinese diagnostic methods to identify signs and formulate acupuncture and herbal formulars appropriate to the condition, either herbs, acupuncture or both.

The whole process is discussed in depth during the session.

Treatment formulations take into account what the patient has told the practitoner and what the practitoner has discovered through TCM diagnosis.  By being taught how to incorporate all this information together the student can see the big picture from the onset.

There are 20 Lessons grouped together into 10 modules in each of the first and second years. The lectures are on weekends, each lesson lasts 6 hours, from 10 am till 5 pm Saturday and Sunday with a one hour break for lunch.

(This can also be done midweek on apprenteship style basis)

Total Contact Days over the 2 years 40 (contact hours 240)

1 year optional clinical attachment contact hours (150 extra hours plus 60 hours home study)

Recommended Home Study and research hours 768

Clinic Practice and Experiance hours during course days 256

Each module will include clinical and theoretic training in acupuncture, herbal medicine and chinese diagnosis and chinese anatomy/physiology.

These 12 modules of the first year are then repeated so that students can begin the course on any module and provided that all 12 modules are successfully completed they can then proceed to the second year which has a similar continual arrangement.

The course is designed on a modular basis to allow for our roll on roll off entrance policy, applicants can join the course starting on any module.

The first 12 modules all have a similar structure, the following things are explained within each module:

Short written test and oral questioning on the main acupoints and herbs of the previous module and relevant homework assignments are given each month around understanding the modern and traditional concepts of the topics covered each month.
.
The natural proceses of the organ that the module is teaching and its relationship with the other organs.

The pathway of the meridian and its connections with other organs and meridians. The points that are used in clinical practice on that meridian, their location, the correct needle length and depth of insertion and the correct direction.

For excessive conditions the needle is inserted against the direction of the energy flow in that meridian, for deficiency conditions the needle is inserted in the direction of the energy flow of the meridian.

Also taught are:

The relevant needle manipulation techniques for each point

Diseases, illnesses and injuries that can affect each organ/meridian.

The pulse, tongue and face diagnosis that relates to each organ/meridian.

Common acupuncture and herbal formulations used to treat ailments in each organ/meridian system.

The medicinal use, action and contra indication of each herbal medicine and its common use is taught as well as how the herbs work together in a formula.

Successful graduates will be awarded a Degree level Diploma in Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine and will be entitled to use the initials Dip Ac TCM after thier names and will be accepted as a members of the Acupuncture Society.

Members of the Acupuncture Society, and are also entitled to use the initials MAcS TCM after their names. There is an annual subscription fee of £100 and insurance can be arranged for around £87 per annum.


Short written and oral testing on the main content of previous module, monthly home assignments researching the modern Western and traditional Chinese aspects of each topic with class discussions


Pulse diagnosis, theory, interpretation and practice, cross correlating between Chinese pulse tongue eye theory and diagnostic teminology with common western conditions


Detailed practical pulse face tongue eye theory analysis
common conditions and treatment by acupuncture and herbal formulations


Practical needling of acupoints, herbs and herbal and acupuncture formulations for common conditions.


Understanding acupoint and herbal formulations also practical medicinal use and contra indication and the progression from diagnosis to treatment formulation

Students can elect to cover Acupuncture or Chinese Herbal Medicine only but all are obliged to cover the full TCM diagnosis and theory

End of year Examinations


First and Second Year Modules (weekend 2 Year Course)
Mornings are Chinese Herbal and TCM Diagnosis
Afternoons are All Types of Acupuncture
 
2014 Dates

 

22 / 23 November 2014
Saturday

Morning Tongue Face & Chinese Irridology Diagnosis

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Gynacological Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Triple Warmer Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

13 / 14 December 2014
Saturday

Morning Practical Pulse Reading & Diagnosis

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Dermatological Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Gall Bladder Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

2015 Dates

 

21 / 22 February 2015
Saturday

Morning Practical TCM Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Practical Korean Hand Acupuncture & Magnetic Therapy

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Anti-inflamatory Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Liver Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

21 / 22 March 2015
Saturday

Morning Practical TCM Diagnosis and Discussion

Tongue Face & Chinese Irridology Diagnosis

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Oedema Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Conception and Governing Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

18 / 19 April 2015
Saturday

Morning Practical Pulse Reading & Diagnosis

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Liver Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Lung and Large Intestine Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

16 / 17 May 2015
Saturday

Morning Practical TCM Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Making Balms for Musculo-skelital conditions

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Stomach Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

20 / 21 June 2015
Saturday

Morning Tongue Face & Chinese Irridology Diagnosis

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Anti-rheumatic Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Sunday Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Spleen and Heart Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

18 / 19 July 2015
Saturday

Morning Practical Pulse Reading & Diagnosis

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Astringent herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture with Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Small Intestine Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

19/20 Sept 2015 
Saturday

Morning Practical TCM Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Clearing Heat Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Bladder Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

24/25 October  2015 
Saturday

Morning Formulars and Strategies Herbal Topics 1

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture Gua Sha Cupping

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Replenishing Essence herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Kidney and Pericardium Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

21 / 22 November 2015
Saturday

MorningTongue Face & Chinese Irridology Diagnosis

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Dampness Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Triple Warmer Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

12 / 13 December 2015
Saturday

Morning Practical Pulse Reading & Diagnosis

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Blood Tonic Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Gall Bladder Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

2016 Dates

 

20 / 21 February 2016
Saturday

Morning Practical TCM Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Practical Korean Hand Acupuncture & Magnetic Therapy

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Blood Moving Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Liver Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

19 / 20 March 2016
Saturday

Morning Tongue Face & Chinese Irridology Diagnosis

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Haemostatic Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Conception and Governing Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

16 / 17 April 2016
Saturday

Morning Practical Pulse Reading & Diagnosis

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Spleen Tonic Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Lung and Large Intestine Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

21 / 22 May 2016
Saturday

Morning Practical TCM Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Kidney Yin Yang herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Stomach Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

18 / 19 June 2016
Saturday

Morning Making Balms for Skin Conditions

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Cardio-vascular Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Spleen and Heart Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

16 / 17 July 2016
Saturday

Morning Tongue Face & Chinese Irridology Diagnosis

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Gastro Entero Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture with Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Small Intestine Meridian Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

17/18 Sept 2016 
Saturday

Morning Practical Pulse Reading & Diagnosis

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Genito-urinary Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Bladder Meridian Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

15/16 October  2016 
Saturday

Morning Formulars and Strategies Herbal Topics 2

Afternoon Cosmetic Acupuncture Gua Sha Cupping & Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

Sunday

Morning written test on previous months topics

Virus Herbal Topic Diagnosis and Discussion

Afternoon Orthopaedic, Spinal, Traditional & Auricular Acupuncture with TCM Diagnosis Clinical

1st Year Topics: Kidney and Pericardium Meridians Conditions Points, Herbs and Syndromes

 

HOMEWORK FOR ACUPUNCTURE AND HERBAL STUDENTS

 

1 a). 1st Year Acupuncture and Herbal Assignments - work through content of 1st Year Tests in Google docs and source the info you need from Practical TCM Acu Herb Meridian info file or in the Practical TCM Book.


b)  Fill in at home the blank Herb, Diagnosis & Acupuncture table form:https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9WedN1MwsbAWjNTYzh1ZTdhSnM&authuser=0 Choosing 10 herbs from previous months topic and hand in at next months class and begin to get familiar and memorise as much as possible.


2. 1st & 2nd Year Acupuncture/Herbal Assignments -  Monthly Cut/Paste Research on each month's topics (To be emailed in to acusoc@yahoo.co.uk prior to the following month’s lesson in word docx format or pdf) all students must ensure that all their home assignments are up to date and have been are covered.


Include in each Assignment:


  1. Western medical approach of diagnosis and treatment.

  2. TCM classical formula approach on diagnosis and treatment.

  3. The classical herbal formulas should include the mandarin pinyin names, the herbal contents of each formula, and also paste in the section of each individual herb action which you perceive is relevant to its healing role within the formula.

  4. Include all acupoints using point numbers, and where acupoint formulas are given, include the reasons why each point has been chosen next to each point.

  5. Cut and paste relevant topics into a word document and email in as your monthly home assignment.  Each topic should be approximately 4000 words.

3rd year Herbal Students Include in Herbal Assignment Topic:


To research the current monthly topic in the Blue Poppy Chinese Hospital Reports which you have been given access to in Google docs, and cut and paste relevant topics into a word document and email in as your monthly home assignment (include as many relevant reports as you can find).


Include other TCM research which has been done in Western style that you can find online relating to those topics where TCM herbal treatments were used.  During monthly class tests they should create herbal formula’s around previous months topics.


HOMEWORK FOR ACUPUNCTURE STUDENTS


Acupuncture 1st year Assignments


Work through, familiarise and study the TCM Core Information content contained in our books, Google docs files and handouts and the current monthly meridian conditions points and syndromes.  Hand in each month your completed Acupuncture meridian and points test and any other core information tests given to you by your tutor.


Acupuncture 2nd year Assignments


Research current monthly topics online and within our books and hospital research content, then submit monthly cut paste research from modern western medical, TCM diagnostic and western and TCM treatment perspectives.  Include all acupoints by point numbers, and where acupoint formulas are given include the reasons why each point has been chosen next to each point, and cut and paste relevant topics into a word document and email in as your monthly home assignment


Acupuncture 3rd Year Assignments


Include other Western or Chinese medical research which has been done in Western style that you can find online relating to those topics where Acupuncture treatments were used.  3rd Year monthly class tests are to create Acupuncture formula’s around previous months topics.

 


Example for Student Cut/Paste Coursework Submissions (to be Submitted by email each month)


Herb Diagnosis Acupuncture Monthly Topic Test Sheet (print and bring 2 copies to class for monthly classroom test)



2 year Acupuncture course objectives

 

To gain knowlege of the 14 main meridians thier pathways, directions subpathways and connections to zhang and fu paired organs and bowels 

To know main most effective points on each meridian how to combine them for most useful therapeutic effects, to understand when to apply reinforcing and reducing directional stimulation and manipulations

To gain anatomy and physiology level 3 standards

To understandTCM theory anatomy, physiology and diagnostic assesments of pulse, tongue, face, eye, smell, touch, observation, listening, interrogation, constitutional types, organ emotional orifice body structure relationships through five element correspondance, eight principles, shu points, mu points, connecting points, sacral points, orthpaedic points, holistic points, spinal para-vertebral points, ashi trigger points, common extra points.

Application of converting and assimulating diagnostic signs, medical and patient information into useful and effective point treatment combinations.

To gain aptitude in composing and administering such formulations. Showing the ability to read pulse, face, tongue and eye and crosscorrelate information to find bases for effective treaments

To demonstrate awareness of health and safety issues, safe practice, keeping good records, legal and ethical issues and professionalism

Chinese herbal medicine course objectives

 

Gain core knowlege of 200 common used herbs to include TCM action, medicinal use, contra indication and practical uses and formulation both theoretical and clinical environments

To understandTCM theory anatomy, physiology and diagnostic assesments of pulse, tongue, face, eye, smell, touch, observation, listening, interrogation, constitutional types, organ emotional orifice body structure relationships through five element correspondance, eight principles,

Students to be able to convert and assimulate TCM diagnostic signs with medical and patient information and be able to formulate practical useful and effective herbal treatment combinations.

To gain aptitude in composing and administering such formulations. Showing the ability to read pulse, face, tongue and eye and crosscorrelate information to find bases for effective treaments

To demonstrate awareness of health and safety issues, safe practice, keeping good records, legal and ethical issues and professionalism

Course AdmissionAdmission RequirementsReturn to Top ↑

Prospective students should be Qualified in anatomy and physiology level 3 or above (if not go to the following link for courses online from 99 dollars in America or between £250-400 for a UK based one

http://www.ccmlondon.com/acupuncture_courses/anatomy

_and_physiology/

PLEASE READ OUR TREATMENT SAFETY CHECK LIST BELOW BEFORE ATTENDING CCM COURSES:

The list below is a student safety guide used prior undertaking a CCM course. We aim to protect the health and safety of students in training and also those they practise on during and after the course.

If you suffer from any of the conditions listed below or other conditions which have not been included that you feel are relevant, please inform us prior to class treatments so that we can assess you suitability for such treatment.

Where there is any doubt please consult your GP.

- A recent operation
- An untreated medical condition
- Severe Bone or joint disorders (Rheumatoid/Osteo arthritis, osteoporosis)
- Cardiovascular disorders (high blood pressure, heart / circulatory desease, thrombosis)
- Diabetes
- Endocrine disorders
- Epilepsy
- Drug addiction or recent use of cocktails of recreational and prescribed drugs and or exessive alcohol consumption
- Medication
- Pregnancy (or post natal)
- Severe skin disorders
- Severe mental illness
- Spinal injuries
- Prone to fainting
- If you suffer from infectious deseases like hepatitis b or HIV

You must also have eaten about 2 hours prior to treatment (please inform tutor if you haven't

- If there anything else we should know about your health, please let the tutor know.
- The same proceeding is required prior to treating your clients or during assignments

Course FeeFeeReturn to Top ↑

The course fee is £2500 per year

If you wish to study full time or wish to complete the optional year clinical attachment there will be an additional charge of £50 per clinical day contact acusoc@yahoo.co.uk or Call Paul Robin to discuss this additional option on 0773 4668402

For any questions about the weekday only courses please email Paul Brecher at paul@taiji.net or Call For More Details on 07534493888

After successfully completing your course there is a £30 certification charge

http://www.ccmlondon.com/ccm_certification.php

Membership to the Acupuncture Society is available to course attendees
(upon paying the annual membership fee of £100)

http://www.acupuncturesociety.org.uk/application-form.php

(Please note that course fees are non-refundable)

Fees are directly payable by chq's made out to your course tutor account

CCM cannot accept payment on behalf of each individual tutor

Course TutorTutorsReturn to Top ↑

Paul Brecher FAcS MPCHM
About Me #01

Principal of The College of Chinese Medicine

Paul Brecher studied at Fook Sang College and later at The College of Chinese Medicine, he was also apprentice to Dr Ac Bernard Kai Lam Lee and Paul Robin.

He has been teaching and practicing Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine for over 16 years and Chinese Martial Arts and Healing Arts for 30 years. Teaching Qi Gong and Tai Chi Chuan, Bagua Chang and Wutang Shan Chuan. His ten instructional DVDs and eight books on the Chinese healing and martial arts have been translated into numerous languages and are on sale internationally.

Paul edited the English language version of the Chinese governments Qi Gong book - Knocking at the Gate of Life - and has been in the national press, on radio and on TV many times explaining and demonstrating the many great benefits of the Chinese martial and healing arts.

He has been developing the College syllabus for many years and has refined it into a systematic practical student friendly form.

Paul lectures at the College of Chinese Medicine and is also a specialist TCM consultant at the Clinic of the College of Chinese Medicine.

Interviewed by Sky TV News on 9 July 2004 to help explain to the public more about Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Interviewed by BBC Lunchtime News on 21 December 2004 and demonstrated advanced Acupuncture techniques.



Paul Robin
Paul Robin FAcS MPCHM MCAA

Head of the College of Chinese Medicine TCM faculty Chairman of the Acupuncture Society

Paul Robin has been teaching and practicing Traditional Chinese medicine for over 20 years. He was trained in the Fook Sang style by Dr Ac Bernard Kai Lam Lee (who was a TCM specialist brought over from China by the British Acupuncture Association) and qualified in 1987. Paul was Dr Lees full time apprentice and assistant for 9 years during which time he conducted research and lectured at the Fook Sang courses held at Imperial College and was President of the Fook Sang Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Practitioners Association.

In 1994 Paul founded the College of Chinese Medicine and some years later founded the Acupuncture Society in order to establish Chinese style Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine in the UK.

Paul specializes in Spinal, Traditional and Chinese Medical Style Deep Needling Acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Diagnosis and complex Chinese Herbal formulations.

He represents the Acupuncture Society in the Acupuncture Stakeholders Group which is working with leading members of the profession toward the future regulation of Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine and preparing for the professions inclusion into the NHS.

Paul lectures at the College of Chinese Medicine and is also a specialist TCM consultant at the Clinic of the College of Chinese Medicine in Harley Street.

BBC Radio Interview Paul Robin on Youtube

Paul Robin interview in the Dailymail

paul robin bbc interview

Read more of Paul Robins News Comments on:

 

Frequently Asked Questions


Question

Please can you explain the difference between the four main courses you teach at The College of Chinese Medicine ?


Answer

Course One:

The main course lasts two years and you are taught Acupuncture, TCM Diagnosis and Chinese Herbal Medicine. This course is taught on weekends, twelve weekends in the first year and another twelve in the second year, one weekend a month. With this course there is an additional option to attend a student clinic once a week, on wednesdays in the first year and thursdays in the second year. On successful completion of the course you are awarded your diploma qualification and can then apply for membership of the Acupuncture Society http://www.acupuncturesociety.org.uk and commence work as a practitioner. This two year weekend course costs £2500 per year, so it is £5000 for the whole course. On this course there is an additional £50 a day charge for attending the wednesday or thursday student clinic.The first year of the course and the wednesday student clinic are both taught in East Finchley. The second year of the course and the thursday student clinic are both taught in Temple Fortune.


Course Two:

This is exactly the same as Course One except you do not study Chinese Herbal Medicine.


Course Three:

This is called the apprenticeship course, it is exactly the same content as Course One but it is not taught on weekends, it is taught only on the wednesday clinics in the first year and the thursday clinics in the second year. The apprenticeship course is also a 2 year course.


Course Four:

This is exactly the same as Course Three except you do not study Chinese Herbal Medicine.


With all these four courses if the student has completed the training and passed all the exams they will be awarded with their qualification and can then apply for membership of the Acupuncture Society and commence work as a practitioner. However if they have done two years of training and their standard is still below what is required they will be asked to attend further training until they are at the required level of competence. 


Question

Do I have to wait until September to start one of the four courses described above ?


Answer

No, you can join at any time of the year as lessons are modular.


Question

What is the process for joining the course ?


Answer

Please fill out the online application form and send an email to paul@ccmlondon.com requesting an interview.


Question

Once I have been qualified can I practice in the NHS ?


Answer

At present any qualified provider (which includes our graduates) can practice Acupuncture within the NHS provided that the Doctors Runnig the practice agree and are prepared to recommend you. Most graduates of our courses practice in health centres, sports centres, in private clinics, in their own business premisses or home clinics. Insurance is available for graduates of our College.


Question

Once I have been qualified at your College I can practice acupuncture anywhere in the UK but can I practice anywhere in the world ?


Answer

Every country has its own criteria, for example in some countries you must be a Doctor first to be able to practice acupuncture. In some other countries you may have to take an additional exam to prove that you are at a suitable level of competence. Please contact the embassy of the country you are intending to practice in to find out what their requirements are. Generally Eu law allows those who can legally practice in one member state to be able to practice in an other, but to be sure you would need to check with the appropriate officials in that country.


Question

If I train at your college will I be able to practice once government regulation comes into effect ?


Answer

Back in 2011 it was decided by the government that there in not going to be regulation of the Acupuncture profession. A written Ministerial Statement (16th February 2011) from The Secretary of State for Health says that acupuncture in the UK is going to remain self regulating as it is now. 


Question

What is the difference between your College and a University degree course ?


Answer

We are a practical training College, our courses are accredited by the Acupuncture Society, our courses will completion enable you to be able to practice acupuncture with a high level of professional expertise, competence and confidence. The University degree courses are often philosophical, theoretical, academic, and generally not practical. Some are undersubscribed and are closing their courses due to lack of student numbers Many have already done so. Our degree level courses are accreditied by the Acupuncture Society rather than a University, we use many practical methods to teach both theory and clinical practice. We also run Diploma and CPD courses.


At University you spend the majority of your time writing essays and reading books and discussing complex philosophical theories with limited practical experiance. At our College you spend the majority of your time learning useful acupuncture techniques and applying them right from the start. Our ethos is to install confidence and to teach practical theories which lead to effective clinical treatment.


University degree courses teach many acupuncture points, which in reality are not often used as they may be in over vulnerable anatomical locations or over embarrassing areas, some of these also may not work very well. At our college we focus on points which are actually commonly used in clinical practice. These points are the ones which are safe, easy to access and most effective. Most Universities in China and Uk have too many students in the class which is why they need to concentrate on Academic study. Acupuncture is a practitcal clinical skill which has been traditionaly taught for many centuries and the skills have been handed down from master to pupil. This is the preferred method of our College and classes are kept small and practical to acheive this.

 


Chinese herbal medicine has been recently taught in Universities to promote the use of patent remedies which are now restricted by EU law. At our college we have always taught individual herb knowlege. Herbs which are non toxic, cheap, easy to obtain, legal, effective and in common use in clinical practice, moreover we focus to teach the students the abillity to formulate their own formulas tailor made to the patients according to TCM and western diagnosis. These formulas are regularly modified to ensure that they are safe and not presenting unwanted side effects. Treatments made in this way are not subject to EU restrictions as they are made up by a qualified practitioner and not sold as a herbal product. Our college has always been teaching in this way and we disagree with the use of patent remedies.


As we use modern and direct methods of teaching and because both herbal medicines and acupuncture share the same TCM and western theory, we can train you to be a practitioner of both subjects in two years. We do however offer the option of an extra year for those who wish to develope their practical skills further in clinical environment.


On a University degree course you may not have much experience with actually doing acupuncture, at our college you will be doing acupuncture in every lesson, even from your very first day.


Many students who have done Uni course know a lot about interesting but non relevant subjects such as: the history of China, the Chinese language, Chinese philosophy and complex abstract theories from ancient manuscripts that are not actually used in practical acupuncture. Many of these do not translate well into English and only serve to mystify Chinese medicine and confuse students


At our College students are trained how to construct an acupuncture and herbal formula from diagnosing the patient through the Pulse, Face, Tongue, eye , also using western concept and symptomology, they are trained in how to acupuncture the patient with the correct length needles inserted to the correct depth at the correct angle to achieve the desired healing result. We teach many advanced methods such as acupuncture of the spine and formulas that combine both re enforcing and reducing acupuncture simultaneously. These advanced practical skills are generally not taught at Uni , but are taught at our college as our college ethos encourages this.


Question

Do you do five elements acupuncture ? I have heard of some other colleges offering courses in five elements acupuncture are you a five elements college ?


Answer

There are many principles in acupuncture,  5 elements,  blood, jing and qi,  yin and yang,  8 diagnostic principles,  hollow and solid organs, 12 meridians and 8 extra meridians, syndromes etc. At our college we teach all the above and much more, they are all important components of acupuncture, it would not make sense to prioritise one over the others as they all are equally important parts of the whole. However we teach these theories from a practical point of view not as only as abstract philosophies. 


Question

You say your course is practical not philosophical, what does this actually mean ?  


Answer

Other colleges and universities will teach that a certain acupuncture point should be used because it is in a certain category:

It is a mother point

It is a son point

It is an element point wood/fire/earth/metal/water 

It is on a meridian which relates to an element wood/fire/earth/metal/water

It is a spring/stream/river/sea point 

It is a xi cleft point

It is a yuan source point 

It is a luo connecting point

It is a ghost point 

It is a window to heaven point 

etc 


At our college we teach that for a certain condition points should be chosen because of their actual medical effect:

This point clears inflammation

This point brings down temperature

This point strengthens the respiratory system

This point strengthens the digestive system

This point strengthens the immune system

This point relaxes the piriformis muscle to reduce sciatica

This point treats myasthenia (muscle weakness)

This point regulates the cardiac nerve

This point clears migraine 

This point is for insomnia 
All this is formulated with the patients constitution, and medical conditions in mind


Question

You say your course teaches Chinese acupuncture, what is the difference between Chinese and English acupuncture ?  


Answer

Western acupuncture generally only uses a very few needles, maybe four or five pairs of point will be used in one treatment which are generally formulated on five element principles to balance qi or are musculo skelital based. In Chinese acupuncture we use as many needles as is necessary to treat the patient who may often have multiple conditions.

*Please note that this degree level diploma course is accredited by the acupuncture society and not by a university

http://www.acupuncturesociety.org.uk/accredited_courses.php

Application FormApplication FormReturn to Top ↑

Please submit this form and the course tutor will respond to your email to inform you of whether you have been accepted. If you have any queries about this course please contact
Paul Brecher on 07534 493 888 or email: paul@taiji.net (weekday or Wednesday courses) or Contact Paul Robin acusoc@yahoo.co.uk (weekend or Thursday courses) call 07734668402


Acupuncture SocietyAcupuncture Society membershipReturn to Top ↑

Successful graduates from this course can apply for membership of the Acupuncture Society are entitled to use the abbreviations MAcS TCM after their names the society can also arrange professional indemnity insurance at a very competitive members preferential rate

all members must be insured and log 15 hours of CPD per year (8 hours courses/seminars/workshops and 7 hours home study/research)

Acupuncture Society Application Form

if they join the Society and adhere to its code of ethics rules and regulations and supply copies of their insurance.

Acupuncture Society members are exempted from Local Authority Licensing in many areas including Greater London please check with your local authority.

The annual membership to the Acupuncture Society is £100

The College of Chinese Medicine

Thank you for your application!

Your course tutor will contact you as soon as possible.
If you do not receive a reply within the next few days please call the course tutor.